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Sawing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Wood
SOC Code: 51-7041.00

Set up, operate, or tend wood sawing machines. May operate CNC equipment. Includes lead sawyers.

Sample of reported job titles: Bandmill Operator, Cut Off Saw Operator, Edgerman, Knot Saw Operator, Panel Saw Operator, Planer, Resaw Operator, Rip Saw Operator, Saw Operator, Sawyer

Tasks

  • Inspect and measure workpieces to mark for cuts and to verify the accuracy of cuts, using rulers, squares, or caliper rules.
  • Adjust saw blades, using wrenches and rulers, or by turning handwheels or pressing pedals, levers, or panel buttons.
  • Mount and bolt sawing blades or attachments to machine shafts.
  • Set up, operate, or tend saws or machines that cut or trim wood to specified dimensions, such as circular saws, band saws, multiple-blade sawing machines, scroll saws, ripsaws, or crozer machines.
  • Inspect stock for imperfections or to estimate grades or qualities of stock or workpieces.
  • Monitor sawing machines, adjusting speed and tension and clearing jams to ensure proper operation.
  • Sharpen blades or replace defective or worn blades or bands, using hand tools.
  • Guide workpieces against saws, saw over workpieces by hand, or operate automatic feeding devices to guide cuts.
  • Clear machine jams, using hand tools.
  • Lubricate or clean machines, using wrenches, grease guns, or solvents.
  • Adjust bolts, clamps, stops, guides, or table angles or heights, using hand tools.
  • Examine logs or lumber to plan the best cuts.
  • Trim lumber to straighten rough edges or remove defects, using circular saws.
  • Count, sort, or stack finished workpieces.
  • Position and clamp stock on tables, conveyors, or carriages, using hoists, guides, stops, dogs, wedges, or wrenches.
  • Measure and mark stock for cuts.
  • Operate panelboards of saw or conveyor systems to move stock through processes or to cut stock to specified dimensions.
  • Examine blueprints, drawings, work orders, or patterns to determine equipment set-up or selection details, procedures to be used, or dimensions of final products.
  • Pull tables back against stops and depress pedals to advance cutterheads that shape stock ends.
  • Select saw blades, types or grades of stock, or cutting procedures to be used, according to work orders or supervisors' instructions.
  • Cut grooves, bevels, or miters, saw curved or irregular designs, and sever or shape metals, according to specifications or work orders.
  • Unclamp and remove finished workpieces from tables.
  • Dispose of waste material after completing work assignments.

Technology Skills

  • Industrial control software - Computerized numerical control CNC software
  • Inventory management software - Automated inventory software
  • Office suite software - Microsoft Office
  • Presentation software - Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Spreadsheet software - Microsoft Excel
  • Word processing software - Microsoft Word

Tools Used

  • Adjustable wrenches - Adjustable hand wrenches
  • Belt conveyors - Conveyer belt systems
  • Bench dog - Bench dogs
  • Bevels - Sliding t-bevels
  • Biscuit jointers
  • C clamps
  • Calipers - Dial calipers; Digital calipers; Vernier calipers
  • Desktop computers
  • Extension pole - Pike poles
  • Forestry saws - Crosscut saws; Head saws
  • Forklifts
  • Grease guns
  • Hoists - Hoisting equipment
  • Hold down clamps - Holding clamps
  • Mainframe console or dumb terminals - Computer terminals
  • Personal computers
  • Planing machines - Planers
  • Power drills
  • Power sanders
  • Power saws - Band scroll saws; Circular saws; Contour band saws; Cutoff saws (see all 9 examples)
  • Rulers - Precision rulers; Steel rules
  • Saw guide - Saw guides
  • Sawing machines - Miter saws; Multiple blade sawing machines
  • Screwdrivers - Straight screwdrivers
  • Scroll saw - Scroll saws
  • Sharpening stones or tools or kits - Honing stones
  • Spot welding machine - Portable welding equipment
  • Squares - Combination squares
  • Tape measures - Measuring tapes
  • Utility knives

Knowledge

  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.

Abilities

  • Control Precision - The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness - The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Manual Dexterity - The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Finger Dexterity - The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Rate Control - The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
  • Reaction Time - The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
  • Multilimb Coordination - The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
  • Selective Attention - The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
  • Stamina - The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
  • Trunk Strength - The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
  • Deductive Reasoning - The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Depth Perception - The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
  • Far Vision - The ability to see details at a distance.
  • Inductive Reasoning - The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Static Strength - The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.

Interests

  • Interest code: RCI
    • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
    • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
    • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Work Context

  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets - 100% responded “Every day.”
  • Exposed to Hazardous Equipment - 98% responded “Every day.”
  • Exposed to Contaminants - 89% responded “Every day.”
  • Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable - 89% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate - 60% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Indoors, Not Environmentally Controlled - 76% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Standing - 64% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls - 61% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions - 72% responded “Every day.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions - 56% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Pace Determined by Speed of Equipment - 46% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Time Pressure - 56% responded “Every day.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work - 46% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Contact With Others - 50% responded “Constant contact with others.”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions - 47% responded “More than half the time.”
  • Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body - 51% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Very Hot or Cold Temperatures - 45% responded “Every day.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team - 38% responded “Very important.”
  • Responsible for Others' Health and Safety - 40% responded “Moderate responsibility.”
  • Responsibility for Outcomes and Results - 47% responded “High responsibility.”
  • Duration of Typical Work Week - 47% responded “40 hours.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results - 27% responded “Very important results.”
  • Physical Proximity - 43% responded “Moderately close (at arm's length).”
  • Frequency of Decision Making - 39% responded “Every day.”
  • Coordinate or Lead Others - 40% responded “Fairly important.”
  • Spend Time Walking and Running - 36% responded “More than half the time.”

Education

Percentage of RespondentsEducation Level Required
59%High school diploma or equivalent
22%Less than high school diploma
10%Post-secondary certificate

Work Styles

  • Attention to Detail - Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability - Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Self Control - Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Stress Tolerance - Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Integrity - Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Persistence - Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Independence - Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Cooperation - Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Initiative - Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Concern for Others - Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility - Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Innovation - Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
  • Achievement/Effort - Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Leadership - Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
  • Analytical Thinking - Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Social Orientation - Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

Work Values

  • Support - Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
  • Independence - Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Working Conditions - Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

Wages & Trends

  • Median wages (2017)
    • $13.98 hourly, $29,080 annual
  • Employment (2016)
    • 55,000 employees
  • Projected growth (2016-2026)
    • Little or no change (-1% to 1%)
  • Projected job openings (2016-2026)
    • 6,200

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